Public Notices

ADOT, DPS expand safety corridor

Dec. 13, 2016 - Arizona Department of Transportation, Department of Public Safety and Governor’s Office of Highway Safety are designating 63 miles of Interstates 10 and 40, and U.S. 60 as safety corridors. Read the release.


Arizona Public Service Company (APS)

A case filed with the Arizona Corporation Commission (AzCC) June 1 would increase APS’ revenue by $166 million annually, money that would largely go toward maintaining and modernizing power plants and the grid, the utility said in a statement. Most of the increase would come from residential, not commercial customers. APS’ rates have increased 1.6 percent per year, on average, the past 20 years. Meanwhile, incentives for rooftop solar installations would be significantly lower. Changes could be implemented in 2017. View the docket.

CONTACT THE COMMISSION

Aug. 18, 2016 - APS to build a substation north of Daisy Mountain Post Office, on 43rd Avenue. Read the release.
Oct. 7, 2016 - APS releases construction timeline. View the document.
March 14, 2017 - Commission to hold public comment in APS rate settlement. Read the release.


Cryptosporidium Outbreak

Aug. 4, 2016 - The Maricopa County Department of Public Health is investigating an outbreak of a diarrheal illnesses caused by the parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum, and is advising the public to take precautions to prevent further spread of the disease. Nineteen cases were reported to public health officials in July, and five of the initial interviews have been linked to recreational water facilities. The investigation is ongoing. View the press release.


Hiking Ban for Canines During Summer Heat

The City of Phoenix Parks and Recreation Board approved a pilot program for three months to prohibit dogs on trails when the temperature reaches 100 degrees or higher. The City of Phoenix also banned all dogs from Camelback Mountain, regardless of temperatures. The rule goes into effect July 8, 2016, and violators may be cited with penalties up to $2,500 and jail time.


Maricopa County 2030 Comprehensive Plan

The Comprehensive Plan covers four primary areas - land use, transportation, and environmental and economic development. The document contains very broad, overriding goals and policies in relation to each of the four sections and “seeks to create strong and vibrant communities within Maricopa County by encouraging orderly development while creating a healthy environment and a healthy economy.” By accommodating new growth in areas that can sustain additional development, the plan endeavors to conserve scarce resources and to build strong communities based on an efficient transportation system, well-protected environmental resources and a strong, diversified economy. The plan’s elements reflect the character of the county’s population, while the policies and implementation tools guide future land use and transportation decisions.

View the Introductory Webinar | View the Draft Plan | View Second Draft | View the Third Draft

Read more about why residents should get involved. Read the ACC Board's letter with recommendations to Maricopa County.

Provide feedback via email or phone at 602-506-3301.

Daisy Mountain Area Plan (formerly New River Area Plan)

Maricopa County is excited to announce it is preparing an update to the Daisy Mountain Area Plan (formerly known as the New River Area Plan) to help guide future growth in the north-central part of unincorporated Maricopa County. Area plans are important in helping prepare for future growth while preserving the unique quality of life residents want. The first step in this update process is to recognize planning-related issues and concerns that are important to you, which is why your participation in our issue identification survey is so important. 

The survey is open-ended, meaning you can share your issues and concerns about any of the planning topics that will comprise individual chapters (aka “elements”) in the final plan. The issues and concerns identified as part of this survey will be used to prepare policies that help address those issues and concerns. When finished with the survey, simply click the “done” button at the bottom of the page and your answers will be forwarded directly to Maricopa County Planning and Development. Complete the survey.

View a map of the Daisy Mountain Area.


MCDOT 20-year Transportation Plan

Transportation System Plan (TSP 2035) Draft Available for Review 

The Maricopa County Department of Transportation (MCDOT) invites your input on the Draft Transportation System Plan (TSP 2035). The open comment period for the draft plan will run through Nov. 16, 2016.

The TSP 2035 is a comprehensive blueprint that guides long range transportation project priorities and the management and investment in Maricopa County’s transportation system. The draft is based on feedback from local cities and towns and thousands of Maricopa County residents who attended public meetings and visited the MCDOT website.

Please visit mcdot.maricopa.gov/tsp to provide input.


Vision 2025: Arizona Comes of Age

In October 2015, the Center for the Future of Arizona (CFA) released "Vision 2025: Arizona Comes of Age," a report that challenges both citizens and leaders to transform what CFA has learned about "who we are" as a state into an action plan designed to achieve the goals of all Arizonans. Be part of the solution.

Download the report.


Update to Under-slab Pipe Leak Litigation

8/28/14: The class action suit settlement for a leak under the slab establishes an administrator to file a claim and the terms.  

Read more about this case. View the settlement documentation.

On December 28, 2007, a complaint was filed by Joan Kirsch v. Del Webb Coventry Homes, Inc. and Pulte Home Corporation CV2007-023536 that was subsequently certified as a Class Action based upon a construction defect known as Thermal Galvanic Corrosion (TGC), a water leak caused by an electro-chemical reaction affecting underground copper water pipes. Over time, TGC will cause small pinhole sized leaks in un-sleeved, underground hot water pipes.

The goal of the Class Action is to enable homeowners to repair their homes with no out-of-pocket expenses. The original Class included 3,331 houses in Anthem.

As with similar class actions, this case is taking time to reach a conclusion. The judge in this case ordered a mandatory settlement hearing on December 9, 2013 which did not result in a settlement. Law firm Fenton Grant Mayfield Kaneda & Litt LLP is representing Anthem in this case and has provided a comprehensive update from lead attorney, Bruce Mayfield: 

Key points:

Anthem residents suspecting to have an under the slab copper pipe leak should contact Attorney Lisa Borowsky, 480-733-6800. An inspector will be sent out at no charge to confirm a potential leak.

For more information: anthempipes.com/index.html.    

NOTE: The Anthem Community Council is not involved with, nor is it a party to this Class Action. This data is provided for informational purposes only.